Monday, November 28, 2016

FAUCET tutorials at NZNOG 2017

http://www.nznog.org/nznog17/nznog-2017-tutorials

Run by two of the core FAUCET development team.

FAUCET supports Netronome adaptors

Netronome produce PCIe adaptors, with an OVS interface (https://www.netronome.com/products/agilio-cx/).

The following shows an Agilio CX 2x10GbE card controlled by FAUCET. As you can see, because the interface to the card is just OVS, FAUCET works exactly the same way as if it were controlling an OVS software-only switch.

root@faucet:~# cat /etc/ryu/faucet/faucet.yaml 
version: 2
vlans:
    100:
        name: "test"
dps:
    netronome-faucet-1:
        dp_id: 0x154d122298
        hardware: "Netronome"
        interfaces:
            1:
                native_vlan: 100
            2:
                native_vlan: 100
root@faucet:~# ovs-ofctl -OOpenFlow13 dump-ports br0
OFPST_PORT reply (OF1.3) (xid=0x2): 3 ports
  port LOCAL: rx pkts=0, bytes=0, drop=0, errs=0, frame=0, over=0, crc=0
           tx pkts=0, bytes=0, drop=0, errs=0, coll=0
           duration=2570.775s
  port  1: rx pkts=14277135, bytes=1056790647, drop=2, errs=0, frame=0, over=0, crc=0
           tx pkts=14338267, bytes=1061587014, drop=0, errs=0, coll=0
           duration=2527.524s
  port  2: rx pkts=14338260, bytes=1061586428, drop=2, errs=0, frame=0, over=0, crc=0
           tx pkts=14277141, bytes=1056790806, drop=0, errs=0, coll=0
           duration=2525.995s
root@faucet:~# ovs-vsctl show 
395541e6-c046-41ad-a32e-bbe2781b9dbe
    Bridge "br0"
        Controller "tcp:127.0.0.1:6633"
            is_connected: true
        fail_mode: secure
        Port "sdn_p1"
            Interface "sdn_p1"
        Port "sdn_p0"
            Interface "sdn_p0"
        Port "br0"
            Interface "br0"
                type: internal
    ovs_version: "2.5.1"

Tuesday, November 8, 2016

FAUCET article on ACM Queue

http://queue.acm.org/detail.cfm?id=3015763

Faucet: Deploying SDN in the Enterprise

Using OpenFlow and DevOps for rapid development


Josh Bailey and Stephen Stuart

The 2008 publication of "OpenFlow: Enabling Innovation in Campus Networks" introduced the idea that networks (originally campus and enterprise networks) can be treated more like flexible software rather than inflexible infrastructure, allowing new network services and bug fixes to be rapidly and safely deployed.7
Since then many have shared their experiences using SDN (software-defined networking) and OpenFlow in wide area and data center networks, including at Google.10 This article returns to enterprise and campus networks, presenting an open-source SDN controller for such networks: Faucet. The Faucet controller provides a "drop-in" replacement for one of the most basic network elements—a switch—and was created to easily bring the benefits of SDN to today's typical enterprise network.5

Friday, November 4, 2016

OpenFlow: not dead yet

http://us8.campaign-archive1.com/?u=394e6edee21a3eea44bef0d13&id=2fd3862ca8&e=025aca6d5b

I can’t tell you exactly where Guru and I were this week, but we were visiting one of our hyperscale member companies, talking about open source software. It was really exciting to see that some of the work we have been doing is actually being leveraged by “the big guys.” While we were talking about plugfests and programs and operations and development plans and communities and all the tools and structures to support dynamic open source projects, our host leaned over and looked at Guru and me as the conversation paused. Guru asked, “What can ONF do for your organization?”, and there was a thoughtful pause.

“Tell everyone . . . OpenFlow is not dead,” were his words, carefully delivered, as if he had been rehearsing them for some time. “Take due care of OpenFlow”, he seemed to say, as if there was some risk that in the hurtling rush to “The Next Big Thing”, we might accidentally divert our attention from some of the core plumbing in the SDN ecosystem.